Environmental Sciences

Division: Natural Sciences

Royden Hobbs
Tom Morris

ENVS 105 F Environmental Biology 3 Units

54 hours lecture per term. This course is for non-science majors and introduces the student to the principles of organismal biology, framed in the context of Earth¿s natural environments. The course examines the interactive relationships between the environment and biological phenomena on all levels. In this exposé, the course explores Earth¿s environmental systems including: global climate system, atmospheric system, aquatic systems, and terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The course highlights life¿s influence on these systems in terms of core biological phenomena including: molecular biology, cellular biology, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, genetics, ecology, evolution, and biodiversity. The course analyzes how both robust and delicate biological systems adjust to a variety of human influences to produce complex environmental transformations. The course emphasizes the fundamental utility of reason and empiricism in scientific discovery and understanding. (CSU) (UC) (Degree Credit) AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC

ENVS 105LF Environmental Biology Lab 1 Unit

Advisory: Concurrent enrollment in ENVS 105 F or completion of ENVS 105 F with a grade of C or better.

9 hours lecture and 27 hours lab or field study per term. This course reveals core biological principles framed in lab and field investigations. Exercises focus on the interactive relationships between biological and physical phenomena on all levels (molecular, cellular, organismal, and ecological). Lab investigations promote the skills of objective experimental design, systematic experimental execution, and accurate results analysis. Field investigations strengthen students' powers of observation in the natural world. Skill development includes making thorough empirical observations, situational awareness of the interactive dynamics of living and non-living components in natural settings, and becoming knowledgeable of local wild species. The course emphasizes the fundamental utility of reason and empiricism in scientific discovery and understanding. (CSU) (UC) (Degree Credit) CSU GE, IGETC

ENVS 106 F Conservation Biology 3 Units

54 hours lecture per term. This course is for non-science majors. This course investigates the growing crisis facing the earth's biological diversity. This course draws from the sciences of genetics, reproductive biology, embryology, evolutionary biology, biogeography, ecology and anthropology. Students will learn core biological principles as they pertain to the current and swift decline in global biodiversity. This course addresses the variety of ways that biological science is being applied now to conserve biodiversity. This is a biology course for non-science majors. (CSU) (UC) (Degree Credit) AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC

ENVS 126 F Natural History of California 3 Units

54 hours lecture per term. This course is designed to acquaint students with the diversity of California's natural geographic, biologic, and geologic regions. After introductory units on basic ecology and basic geology, each of the natural regions of the state is discussed with an emphasis on the common, conspicuous, or unique plants, animals, and geological features. (CSU) (UC) (Degree Credit) AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC

ENVS 126FF  Natural History of California Field Lecture 2 Units

Corequisite(s): ENVS 126 F with a grade of C or better.

36 hours lecture per term. This course is designed to accompany ENVS 126 F and consists of two weekend field trips involving overnight camping. Regions are selected that illustrate California's remarkable diversity. One field trip, emphasizing mountain habitats, is taken to a selected site in the Sierra Nevada or one of the local mountain ranges. The other trip, emphasizing a desert experience, is taken to a site in the local desert such as Anza Borrego Desert State Park, Joshua Tree National Monument, or the Mojave National Preserve. (CSU) (UC) (Degree Credit)

ENVS 140 F Birds of Southern California 1-2 Units

18-36 hours lecture per term. This is a field-oriented course designed to introduce wildlife enthusiasts to the remarkable diversity of birds in Southern California. Students will learn how to identify birds using visual, auditory, and habitat clues in the field. Proper use of field guides, binoculars and spotting scopes, and birding ethics will be emphasized. Although the primary emphasis of this course is placed on bird identification, the ecological context for each species also will be treated, including: ecological niche, life history patterns, migratory patterns, and special adaptations. Field trips are required and may include day trips and/or overnight weekend camping trips. (CSU) (Degree Credit)

ENVS 141 F Desert Natural History 1 Unit

18 hours lecture per term. This course applies ecological principles to investigate desert environments. Activities include lecture on ecological principles and field study in selected California desert ecosystems. Lectures will provide an overview of field natural history concepts, including identification of plants and animals, adaptations to arid environments and ecological interrelationships. Students are trained in the use of various field study techniques and in the use of specific scientific equipment. Field trips are required. (CSU) (Degree Credit)

ENVS 142 F  Geology and Marine Biology of the Channel Islands 2 Units

36 hours lecture per term. This course involves lecture and field study of geological and marine biological processes and features in the Channel Islands region of Southern California. Lectures will examine how to recognize key geologic landforms and marine habitats in the field. Particular attention will be focused on the relationship between geology and the marine life. Students are trained in various field study techniques and the use of scientific instruments. Field trips are required. (CSU) (Degree Credit)

ENVS 143 F  Baja California Field Studies 2 Units

36 hours lecture per term. This course involves lecture and on-site field study of the ecology and biogeography of selected biological communities in Baja California, Mexico. Lectures will cover an introduction to the natural history and unique adaptations of native plants and animals occurring in coastal intertidal, desert riparian habitats. Impacts of humans on these communities will be observed. Lectures will prepare students for planning and executing field projects using appropriate scientific methods and instrumentation. A camping field trip to Baja, California is required. Students will arrange personal transportation. (CSU) (Degree Credit)

ENVS 144 F  Marine Biology of Baja California 2 Units

36 hours lecture per term. This course involves lecture and field study of the marine biology of Baja, California. Lectures will examine the particular physical and biological features that structure this unique marine environment. The factors shaping the Gulf of California versus Pacific coasts will be discussed, including the roles of tidal and wind-driven upwelling in dampening El Nino effects in the Gulf. Students are trained in various field study techniques data analysis, and the use of scientific instruments. Field trips are required. (CSU) (Degree Credit)

ENVS 145 F  Marine Vertebrate Ecology of the Channel Islands 1 Unit

18 hours lecture per term. This course involves lecture and field study of the ecology of marine mammals, seabirds, and fish in the Channel Islands area. Lectures will examine the physical and biological features that structure the marine environment in the region, along with the adaptations and ecological relationships of marine vertebrates living there. Students are trained in various field study techniques, data analysis, and the use of scientific instruments. Field trips are required. (CSU) (Degree Credit)

ENVS 170 F Astrobiology 3 Units

Advisory: BIOL 101 F or completion of college level general biology course with a C or better or completion of Advanced Placement High School biology with a grade of "3" or better on the Placement Exam.

54 hours lecture per term. This course for science majors and science enthusiasts applies principles of biology and ecology to remarkable new world environments. This course considers the prospects for life in other worlds. This science explores robust biological operations in extremely unusual environments. Based on this knowledge, students are challenged to apply a flexible living model to newly-discovered environmental circumstances on other words such as Mars, the moons of Jupiter, and extra solar planets. In the process, students are obliged to reinterpret Earth-based biological paradigms and develop a broader theoretical synthesis. As a result, the student achieves a deeper understanding of the essence of life, and greater intellectual agility for considering life elsewhere and here on Earth. (CSU) (Degree Credit)

ENVS 196 F  Regional Field Studies: Environmental Sciences 1 or 2 Units

18-36 hours lecture per term. Classes are conducted in the short course format, and require participation in fieldwork in a selected biological community in southwestern United States, Mexico, or Costa Rica. Field studies are designed to develop a strong foundation in ecological facts and principles. Emphasis is placed on identifying and studying ecological issues through careful observation, data collection and analysis. Students are trained in various field study techniques and the use of science instruments. Topics include auto-ecological and synecological studies of biological communities, monitoring abiotic factors, field identification of flora and fauna, and human impact on the study area. (CSU) (Degree Credit)

ENVS 299 F  Environmental Sciences Independent Study 1 Unit

54 hours independent study per term. This course involves field/laboratory investigations and/or internships with the guidance by faculty. This course is mainly for majors in environmental sciences who wish to build meaningful, self-directed experience in the discipline through individual study and small group conferences. Students may pursue independent field and/or laboratory investigations, subject to faculty approval and supervision. Outside reading and a written report will be required. Hours to be arranged. Elective credit in the sciences area. (CSU) (Degree Credit)