Anthropology

Division: Social Sciences

Division Dean

Dr. Lisa Gaetje

Faculty

Becky Floyd
Craig Goralski
Jaclyn Magginetti

Counselors

Mymy Lam
Dr. Therese Mosqueda-Ponce
Daniel Pelletier

Anthropology Transfer Program

Students should consult a counselor or www.assist.org for lower division major requirements for most California public universities. (See the Standard Definitions section of the catalog for a description of ASSIST.) Students transferring to an independent college/university should consult the catalog of the individual school and a counselor for lower division major requirements.

ANTH 101 C Biological Anthropology 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 C

Term hours: 54 lecture. This course introduces the concepts, methods of inquiry, and scientific explanations for biological evolution and their application to the human species. Issues and topics will include, but are not limited to, genetics, evolutionary theory, human variation and biocultural adaptations, comparative primate anatomy and behavior, and the fossil evidence for human evolution. The scientific method serves as foundation of the course. Duplicate credit not granted for ANTH 101HC or ANTH 201 C. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC/C-ID: ANTH 110)

ANTH 101HC Honors Biological Anthropology 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 C.

Term hours: 54 lecture. This Honors-enhanced course is an introduction to the concepts, methods of inquiry, and scientific explanations for biological evolution and their application to the human species. Issues and topics will include, but are not limited to, genetics, evolutionary theory, human variation and biocultural adaptations, comparative primate anatomy and behavior, and the fossil evidence for human evolution. The scientific method serves as foundation of the course. Duplicate Credit not granted for ANTH 101 C or ANTH 201 C. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC/C-ID: ANTH 110)

ANTH 101LC Biological Anthropology Lab 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in ANTH 101 C or ANTH 101HC with a grade of C or better.

Term hours: 54 lecture. This laboratory course is offered as a supplement to Biological Anthropology (ANTH 101C/101HC) either taken concurrently or in a subsequent term. It provides an introduction to experiential and experimental laboratory research methods used in biological anthropology. Laboratory exercises are designed to introduce students to the scientific method and explore genetics, the forces of evolution, human variation, human osteology, human and non-human primate anatomy and behavior, the primate and hominin fossil record and other resources to investigate processes that affect human evolution. One field trip to a regional zoo will be required for non-human primate observations. Zoo admissions range $10.00 - $60.00. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC, C-ID: ANTH 115 L)

ANTH 102 C Cultural Anthropology 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 C

Term hours: 54 lecture. This course explores how anthropologists study and compare human culture. Cultural anthropologists seek to understand the diversity of human experience focusing on a set of central issues: how people around the world make their living (subsistence patterns); how they organize themselves socially, politically and economically; how they communicate; how they relate to each other through marriage, family and kinship ties; what they believe about the world (religion and belief systems); how they express themselves creatively (the arts and expressive culture); how they make distinctions among themselves; how they have shaped and been shaped by the past; and how they navigate culture change and processes of globalization. Ethnographic case studies highlight these similarities and differences, and introduce students to how anthropologists do their work, employ professional anthropological research ethics and apply their perspectives and skills to understand humans around the globe. Duplicate credit not granted for ANTH 102 HC. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC, C-ID: ANTH 120)

ANTH 102HC Honors Cultural Anthropology 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 C

Term hours: 54 lecture. This course is an enhanced exploration of how anthropologists study and compare human culture. Cultural anthropologists seek to understand the diversity of human experience focusing on a set of central issues: how people around the world make their living (subsistence patterns); how they organize themselves socially, politically and economically; how they communicate; how they relate to each other through marriage, family and kinship ties; what they believe about the world (religion and belief systems); how they express themselves creatively (the arts and expressive culture); how they make distinctions among themselves; how they have shaped and been shaped by the past; and how they navigate culture change and processes of globalization. Ethnographic case studies highlight these similarities and differences, and introduce students to how anthropologists do their work, employ professional anthropological research ethics and apply their perspectives and skills to understand humans around the globe. Duplicate credit not granted for ANTH 102 C. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC, C-ID: ANTH 120)

ANTH 103 C  Introduction to Archaelogy (formerly ANTH 203 C) 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 C.

Term hours: 54 lecture. This course is an introduction to the study of concepts, theories, data and models of anthropological archaeology that contribute to our knowledge of the human past. The course includes a discussion of the nature of scientific inquiry; the history and interdisciplinary nature of archaeological research; dating techniques; methods of survey, excavation, analysis, and interpretation; cultural resource management; professional ethics; and selected cultural sequences. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC/C-ID: ANTH 150)

ANTH 104 C Comparative Cultures 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 C

Term hours: 54 lecture. This course uses a focused cross-cultural and comparative approach to introduce anthropological concepts such as modes of production, family and kinship, economics, political organization, art and religion. Globalization and culture change will also be explored. A representative selection of culture areas will be featured through ethnography, providing perspective on the variety of human adaptation and how cultural systems are integrated. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC)

ANTH 105 C  Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 C

Term hours: 54 lecture. This introductory course serves as a foundation for understanding language from an anthropological perspective, addressing such core questions as how, what, when, where, why and with whom we communicate. This course surveys three core areas in linguistic anthropology--structural linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology and syntax, as well as the biocultural basis of language; historical linguistics: origins and evolution/change, dialects, and language families; and sociocultural linguistics: language acquisition in cultural context, emphasizing the relationship between language and culture, and issues of language conservation and loss.(UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC/C-ID: ANTH 130)

ANTH 106 C  Human Prehistory and Ancient Civilizations 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 C.

Term hours: 54 lecture. This course is an introduction to the prehistoric development of civilizations both in the Old World and the New World beginning with early modern humans. Because the prehistoric is the time prior to cultures' writing about themselves, students will examine archaeological methods and theories used to describe the past. Topics will include the spread of modern humans, Mesolithic societies, the origins of food production and the evolution and collapse of various world civilizations. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC)

ANTH 107 C Magic, Witchcraft and Religion 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100C.

Term hours: 54 lecture. This course is an introduction to the anthropology of religion. It will explore the beliefs and practices of numerous world cultures, particularly, but not exclusively, focusing on non-Western traditional societies, using a cross-cultural approach. Anthropological perspectives on the study of religion, mythology and symbolism will be discussed. Ritual, magic, divination, shamanism, sorcery, altered states of consciousness, healing, witchcraft, syncretism and new religious movements, among other related topics, will be analyzed with respect to the functions they have and how religion as a cultural institution is integrated into society in general and in the life of the individual. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC)

ANTH 121 C Native North America 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 C

Term hours: 54 lecture. This course is an anthropological survey of the cultures of Native American societies of North America. Topics include the peopling of the New World, traditional culture, the impacts of culture contact both from Western cultures and native peoples' cultures on one another, and contemporary issues. (UC/CSU, CSU GE, AA GE, IGETC, CUL DIV)

ANTH 208 C Anthropology of Death 3 Units

Advisory: Completion of ANTH 102 C or ANTH 104 C or ANTH 107 C.

Term hours: 54 lecture. This course is a cross-cultural exploration of the beliefs and practices surrounding death, dying, mourning, and mortuary customs, as well as conceptions of the afterlife, in both Western and non-Western cultures around the world, and how the individual is impacted sociologically, physiologically and psychologically throughout the life course by issues related to death and dying. It will emphasize how human social, political and economic institutions are inextricably interwoven using an integrated anthropological approach, including data from archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology and cultural anthropology, as well as broader social science perspectives, methods, values and ethics. This course is specifically designed as a general education social science course and to illustrate how understanding beliefs and practices related to death and dying provide lifelong appreciation of the individual as an integrated physiological, social, and psychological being. Duplicate credit not granted for ANTH 308 C. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC)

ANTH 210 C  Introduction to Forensic Anthropology 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 C; prior learning of the skeletal system or human osteology.

Term hours: 54 lecture. This course covers the application of standard, scientific, anthropological methods and techniques to identify human remains and to assist in the detection of a crime or after a mass disaster. This course provides a basic overview of the field of forensic anthropology, human osteology, the techniques used to make estimations of age, sex, ancestry and stature, recovery techniques and the analytic techniques and procedures used in the medico-legal framework. This class includes extensive analysis of anthropological methods, ethics, socio-cultural considerations and civic responsibilities inherent to forensic anthropology. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC)

ANTH 212 C  Applied and Practicing Anthropology (formerly ANTH 211 C) 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility of ENGL 100 C.

Term hours: 54 lecture. This applied anthropology course covers the principles, methodologies, value systems, and ethics of social scientific inquiry and anthropology in particular to solve real-world contemporary and historical human problems, in both Western and non-Western societies. This course will focus on the interwoven nature of human social, political, and economic institutions. Students will explore the perspectives of applied and practicing anthropology across all subfields of anthropology in a manner which develops the student's analytical capacity and understanding of social science in ways that will be useful to any educated citizen and across any academic discipline. The role of anthropologists as practitioners of behavioral science and relationships between course concepts to a broader understanding of social science will be emphasized. An applied research project and/or field trips may be required. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC)

ANTH 225 C  Ancient Cultures of Mexico and Central America 3 Units

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL 100 C

Term hours: 54 lecture. This course explores the diverse cultures of ancient Mesoamerica from the origins of civilization through the initial period of Spanish contact. Mesoamerica is defined as the culture area extending from the Rio Grande to the north to the Isthmus of Panama to the south. While the contributions of all four fields of anthropology will be explored, this course will primarily approach the cultures of Mesoamerica from archaeological and ethnohistoric perspectives. The subsistence practices, social organization and ideologies of past cultures will be presented and links between these ancient lifeways and aspects of the modern cultures of northern Latin America will be discussed. (UC/CSU, AA GE, CSU GE, IGETC)

ANTH 231 C Field Course in Archaeology I 3 Units

Advisory: ANTH 103 C

Term hours: 18 lecture and 108 laboratory. This course provides practical experience in field archaeology through a combination of lectures and laboratory hours in a fieldwork setting. It is designed to provide an introductory understanding of site survey, archaeological methods, laboratory analysis, local prehistory and museum preparation. (CSU)

ANTH 232 C Field Course in Archaeology II 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 231 C with a minimum grade of "C".

Term hours: 18 lecture and 108 laboratory. This course provides intermediate level practical experience in field archaeology. Students will be expected to build on the skills introduced in ANTH 231 C through a combination of lectures and laboratory hours in a fieldwork setting. This class provides a more advanced understanding of site survey, archaeological methods, laboratory analysis, local prehistory and museum preparation, with an emphasis on the curation and analysis of specific artifact types. Students are also expected to mentor students in the co-occurring ANTH 231 C in the field by modeling introductory skills in a field setting. Completion of ANTH 232 C is intended to prepare students for entry-level positions in Cultural Resource Management. (CSU)

ANTH 298 C Anthropology Seminar 0.5-12 Units

Prerequisite(s): May be required.

Corequisite(s): May be required.

Advisory: May be required.

Term hours: 0-12 lecture and 0-36 laboratory. This is a lecture/discussion type course developed on a particular limited problem or topic of interest to students. It is designed for able students who wish to increase their knowledge on a particular topic concerning which no other regular class is offered. A paper or group activity may be requested. Credit may range from 1/2 to 12 units. Consult the class schedule for the offerings in a particular semester. Pass/No Pass or Letter Grade option. Fees may be required-Payable at Registration. (UC Credit Limitation/CSU)

ANTH 299 C Anthropology Independent Study 1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): Approved Independent Study Learning Contract

Term hours: Varying hours of scheduled conferences per week. This course is for able students who wish to extend their knowledge of a particular area through individual research and study. It is thought that topics might develop out of a curiosity stimulated in a regular class. The student would then contact the supervising instructor to develop a contract for his/her particular interest so that they could learn more regarding their special topic. Course may be taken three times for credit. (UC Credit Limitation/CSU)

ANTH 308 C  Anthropology of Death for Mortuary Science 3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Completion of ENGL 100 C or ENGL 100HC with a grade of C or better.

Advisory: Completion of ANTH 102 C or ANTH 104 C or ANTH 107 C.

Term hours: 54 lecture. This is an upper division intensive writing course intended only for Cypress College's Bachelor of Science in Funeral Service students. (All other students interested in this course should take ANTH 208 C - Anthropology of Death). This course is a cross-cultural exploration of the beliefs and practices surrounding death, dying, mourning, and mortuary customs, as well as conceptions of the afterlife, in cultures around the world. An integrated anthropological approach will be taken, including data from archaeology, biological anthropology and cultural anthropology. Enrollment is limited to those accepted into the Funeral Service Bachelor of Science degree program. Duplicate credit not granted for ANTH 208 C.

The courses taught by this department contribute to the General Education and Basic Skills Program Learning Outcomes. Please refer to General Education and Basic Skills Program Learning Outcomes.